Taskotron is EOL (end of life) today

As previously announced, Taskotron (project page) will be shut down today. See the announcement and its discussion for more details and some background info.

As a result, certain tests (beginning with “dist.“) will no longer appear for new updates in Bodhi (in Automated Tests tab). Some of those tests (and even new ones) will hopefully come back in the future with the help of Fedora CI.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to Taskotron in the past or found our test reports helpful.

taskotron

Taskotron is EOL (end of life) today

Automatically shrink your VM disk images when you delete files (Fedora 32 update)

I’ve already written about this in 2017, but things got simpler since then. Time for an update!

If you use virtual machines, your disk images just grow and grow, but never shrink – deleted files inside a VM never free up the space on the host. But you can configure the VM to handle TRIM (discard) commands, and then your disk images will reflect deleted files and shrink as well. Here’s how (with Fedora 32 using qemu 4.2 and virt-manager 2.2).

Adjust VM configuration

  1. When creating a new VM, use qcow2 disk images (that’s the default), not raw.
  2. Your new VM should have VirtIO disks (that’s the default).
  3. In virt-manager in VM configuration, select your VirtIO disk, go to Advanced -> Performance, and set Discard mode: unmap.
    virt-manager-unmap

Test it

Now boot your VM and try to issue a TRIM command:

$ sudo fstrim -av
/boot: 908.5 MiB (952631296 bytes) trimmed on /dev/vda1
/: 6.8 GiB (7240171520 bytes) trimmed on /dev/mapper/fedora-root

You should see some output printed, even if it’s just 0 bytes trimmed, not an error.

Let’s see if the disk image actually shrinks. You need to list its size using du (or ls -s) to see the disk allocated size, not the apparent file size (because the disk image is sparse):

$ du -h discardtest.qcow2 
1.4G discardtest.qcow2

Now create a file inside the VM:

$ dd if=/dev/urandom of=file bs=1M count=500

We created a 500 MB file inside the VM and the disk image grew accordingly (give it a few seconds):

$ du -h discardtest.qcow2
1.9G discardtest.qcow2

Now, remove the file inside the VM and issue a TRIM:

$ rm file -f
$ sudo fstrim -av

And the disk image size should shrink back (give it a few seconds):

$ du -h discardtest.qcow2
1.4G discardtest.qcow2

If you configure your system to send TRIM in real-time (see below), it should shrink right after rm and no fstrim should be needed.

Issue TRIM automatically

With Fedora 32, fstrim.timer is automatically enabled and will trim your system once per week. You can reconfigure it to run more frequently, if you want. You can check the timer using:

$ sudo systemctl list-timers

If you want a real-time TRIM, edit /etc/fstab in the VM and add a discard mount option to the filesystem in question, like this:

UUID=6d368798-f4c2-44f9-8334-6be3c64cc449 / ext4 defaults,discard 1 1

This has some performance impact (they say), but the disk image will shrink right after a file is deleted. (Note: XFS as a root filesystem doesn’t issue TRIM commands without additional tweaking, read more here).

Automatically shrink your VM disk images when you delete files (Fedora 32 update)

Stay informed about QA events

Hello, this is a reminder that you can easily stay informed about important upcoming QA events and help with testing Fedora, especially now during Fedora 32 development period.

The first obvious option for existing Fedora contributors is to subscribe to the test-announce mailing list. We announce all our QA meetings, test days, composes nominated for testing and other important information in there.

A second, not that well-known option which I want to highlight today, is to add our QA calendar to your calendar software (Google Calendar, Thunderbird, etc). You’ll see our QA meetings (including blocker review meetings) and test days right next to your personal events, so they will be hard to miss. A guide how to do that is here on our QA homepage.

Thank you everyone who joins our efforts and helps us make Fedora better.

Stay informed about QA events

Whitelisting rpmlint errors in Taskotron/Bodhi

If you submit a new Fedora update into Bodhi, you’ll see an Automated Tests tab on that update page (an example), and one of the test results (once it’s done) will be from rpmlint. If you click on it, you’ll get a full log with rpmlint output.

If you wish to whitelist some errors which are not relevant for your package or are clearly a mistake (like spelling issues, etc), it is now possible. The steps how to do this are described at:

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Taskotron/Tasks/dist.rpmlint#Whitelisting_errors

This has been often requested, so hopefully this will help you have the automated tests results all in green, instead of being bothered by invalid errors. If something doesn’t work, and it seems to be our bug in how we execute rpmlint (instead of a bug in rpmlint itself), please file a bug in task-rpmlint or contact us (qa-devel mailing list, #fedora-qa IRC channel on Freenode).

Whitelisting rpmlint errors in Taskotron/Bodhi

Automatically shrink your VM disk images when you delete files

Update: This got significantly simpler with newer qemu and virt-manager, read an updated post.

If you use VMs a lot, you know that with the most popular qcow2 disk format, the disk image starts small, but grows with every filesystem change happening inside the VM. Deleting files inside the VM doesn’t shrink it. Of course that wastes a lot of disk space on your host – the VMs often contain gigabytes of freed space inside the VM, but not on the host. Shrinking the VM images is possible, but tedious and slow. Well, recently I learned that’s actually not true anymore. You can use the TRIM command, used to signalize to SSD drives that some space can be freed, to do the same in virtualization stack – signalize from VM to host that some space can be freed, and the disk image shrunk. How to do that? As usual, this is a shameless copy of instructions found elsewhere on the Internets. The instructions assume you’re using virt-manager or libvirt directly.

First, you need to using qcow2 images, not raw images (you can configure this when adding new disks to your VM).

Second, you need to set your disk bus to SCSI (not VirtIO, which is the default).

disk-scsi

Third, you need to set your SCSI Controller to VirtIO SCSI (not hypervisor default).

controller-scsi

Fourth, you need to edit your VM configuration file using virsh edit vmname and adjust your hard drive’s driver line to include discard='unmap', e.g. like this:

<disk type='file' device='disk'>
 <driver name='qemu' type='qcow2' discard='unmap'/>

And that’s it. Now you boot your VM and try to issue:

$ sudo fstrim -av
/boot: 319.8 MiB (335329280 bytes) trimmed
/: 101.5 GiB (108928946176 bytes) trimmed

You should see some output printed, even if it’s just 0 bytes trimmed, and not an error.

If you’re using LVM, you’ll also need to edit /etc/lvm/lvm.conf and set:

issue_discards = 1

Then it should work, after a reboot.

Now, if you want trimming to occur automatically in your VM, you have two options (I usually do both):

Enable the fstrim timer that trims the system once a week by default:

$ sudo systemctl enable fstrim.timer

And configure the root filesystem (and any other one you’re interested in) to issue discard command automatically after each file is deleted. Edit /etc/fstab and add a discard mount option, like this:

UUID=6d368798-f4c2-44f9-8334-6be3c64cc449 / ext4 defaults,discard 1 1

And that’s it. Try to create a big file using dd, watch your VM image grow. Then delete the file, watch the image shrink. Awesome. If only we had this by default.

Automatically shrink your VM disk images when you delete files

SSH to your VMs without knowing their IP address

This is a shameless copy of this blog post, but I felt like I need to put it here as well, so that I can find it the next time I need it 🙂

libvirt approach

When you run a lot of VMs, especially for testing, every time with a fresh operating system, connecting to them is a pain, because you always need to figure out their IP address first. Turns out that is no longer true. I simply added this snippet to my ~/.ssh/config:

# https://penguindroppings.wordpress.com/2017/09/20/easy-ssh-into-libvirt-vms-and-lxd-containers/
# NOTE: doesn't work with uppercase VM names
Host *.vm
 CheckHostIP no
 Compression no
 UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null
 StrictHostKeyChecking no
 ProxyCommand nc $(virsh domifaddr $(echo %h | sed "s/\.vm//g") | awk -F'[ /]+' '{if (NR>2 && $5) print $5}') %p

and now I can simply execute ssh test.vm for a VM named test and I’m connected! A huge time saver. It doesn’t work with uppercase letters in VM names and I didn’t bother to try to fix that. Also, since I run VMs just for testing purposes, I disabled all ssh security checks (you should not do that for important machines).

avahi approach

There’s also a second approach I used for persistent VMs (those that survive for longer than a single install&reboot cycle). You can use Avahi to search for a hostname on the .local domain to find the IP address. Fedora has this enabled by default (if you have nss-mdns package installed, I believe, which should be by default). So, in the VM, set a custom hostname, for example f27:

$ sudo hostnamectl set-hostname f27
$ reboot

Now, you can run ssh f27.local and it should connect you to the VM automatically.

SSH to your VMs without knowing their IP address

Taskotron: depcheck task replaced by rpmdeplint

If you are a Fedora packager, you might be interested to know that in Taskotron we replaced the depcheck task with rpmdeplint task. So if there are any dependency issues with the new update you submit to Bodhi, you’ll see that as dist.rpmdeplint failure (in the Automated Tests tab). The failure logs should look very similar to the depcheck ones (basically, the logs contain the errors dnf would spit out if it tried to install that package), so there should be no transitioning effort needed.

If you listen for depcheck results somehow, i.e. in FMN, make sure to update your rules to listen for dist.rpmdeplint instead. We have updated the default filters in FMN, so if you haven’t changed them, you should receive notifications for failures in rpmdeplint (and also upgradepath and abicheck) for submitted updates owned by you.

The reason for this switch is that we wanted to get rid of custom dependency checking (done directly on top of libsolv), and use an existing tool for that instead. That saves us time, we don’t need to study all the pitfalls of dependency resolution, and we benefit from someone else maintaining and developing the tool (that doesn’t mean we won’t send patches if needed). rpmdeplint offered exactly what we were looking for.

We will decommission depcheck task from Taskotron execution in the next few days, if there are no issues. Rpmdeplint results are already being published for all proposed updates.

If you have any questions, please ask in comments or reach us at #fedora-qa freenode irc channel or qa-devel (or test or devel) mailing list.

Taskotron: depcheck task replaced by rpmdeplint

Welcome Fedora Quality Planet

Hello, I’d like to introduce a new sub-planet of Fedora Planet to you, located at http://fedoraplanet.org/quality/ (you don’t need to remember the URL, there’s a sub-planet picker in the top right corner of Fedora Planet pages that allows you to switch between sub-planets).

Fedora Quality Planet will contain news and useful information about QA tools and processes present in Fedora, updates on our quality automation efforts, guides for package maintainers (and other teams) how to interact with our tools and checks or understand the reported failures, announcements about critical issues in Fedora releases, and more.

Our goal is to have a single place for you to visit (or subscribe to) and get a good overview of what’s happening in the Fedora Quality space. Of course all Fedora Quality posts should also show up in the main Fedora Planet feed, so if you’re already subscribed to that, you shouldn’t miss our posts either.

If you want to join our effort and publish some interesting quality-related posts into Fedora Quality Planet, you’re more then welcome! Please see the instructions how to syndicate your blog. If you have any questions or need help, ask in the test mailing list or ping kparal or adamw on #fedora-qa freenode IRC channel. Thanks!

Welcome Fedora Quality Planet

‘Package XXX is not signed’ error during upgrade to Fedora 24

Many people hit issues like this when trying to upgrade to Fedora 24:

 Error: Package a52dec-0.7.4-19.fc24.x86_64.rpm is not signed

You can easily see that this is a very widespread issue if you look at comments section under our upgrade guide on fedora magazine. In fact, this issue probably affects everyone who has rpmfusion repository enabled (which is a very popular third-party repository). Usually the a52dec package is mentioned, because it’s early in the alphabet listing, but it can be a different one (depending on what you installed from rpmfusion).

The core issue is that even though their Fedora 24 repository is available, the packages in it are not signed yet – they simply did not have time to do that yet. However, rpmfusion repository metadata from Fedora 23 demand that all packages are signed (which is a good thing, package signing is crucial to prevent all kinds of nasty security attacks). The outcome is that DNF rejects the transaction for being unsecure.

According to rpmfusion maintainers, they are working on signing their repositories and it should be done hopefully soon. So if you’re not in a hurry with your upgrade, just wait a while and the problem will disappear soon (hopefully).

But, if you insist that you want to upgrade now, what are your options?

Some people suggest you can add --nogpgcheck option to the command line. Please don’t do that! That completely bypasses any security checks, even for proper Fedora packages! It will get you vulnerable to security attacks.

A much better option is to temporarily remove rpmfusion repositories:

$ sudo dnf remove 'rpmfusion-*-release'

and run the upgrade command again. You’ll likely need to add --allowerasing option, because it will probably want to remove some packages that you installed from rpmfusion (like vlc):

$ sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=24 --allowerasing

This is OK, after you upgrade your system, you can enable rpmfusion repositories again, and install the packages that were removed prior to upgrade.

(I recommend to really remove rpmfusion repositories and not just disable them, because they manage their repos in a non-standard way, enabling and disabling their updates and updates-testing repos during the system lifecycle according to their needs, so it’s hard to know which repos to enable after the system upgrade – they are not the same as were enabled before the system upgrade. What they are doing is really rather ugly and it’s much better to perform a clean installation of their repos.)

After the system upgrade finishes, simply visit their website, install the repos again, and install any packages that you’re missing. This way, your upgrade was performed in a safe way. The packages installed from rpmfusion might still be installed unsafely (depending whether they manage to sign the repo by that time or not), but it’s much better than to upgrade your whole system unsafely.

To close this up, I’m sorry that people are hit by these complications, but it’s not something Fedora project can directly influence (except for banning third-party repos during system upgrades completely, or some similar drastic measure). This is in hands of those third-party repos. Hopefully lots of this pain will go away once we start using Flatpak.

‘Package XXX is not signed’ error during upgrade to Fedora 24